Planners: Preparedness and Response


Introduction


  • Disaster response plans describe how various governmental and private sector entities are supposed to function individually and collaboratively during a disaster in order to protect the public and key infrastructure and continue to perform their missions.
  • Hospitals, public health agencies and other health entities also have response plans specific for their missions.
  • Planning details
    • Some plans are appropriate for all types of incidents: "all hazard" plans.
    • Some plans are hazard-specific e.g., chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, natural disasters
    • Hazard-specific response plans typically contain the critical elements of "all hazard" plans but also include modifications that address hazard-specific features
    • Effective plans are
      • Developed collaboratively by all potential participants
      • Integrated into plans that will be used by others participating in the response
      • Communicated to all those who will perform activities specified by the plan
      • Practiced in formal drills or exercises
      • Updated regularly to reflect lessons learned in formal exercises
  • The nature, scope, and location of a mass casualty disaster will significantly affect the implementation of any response plan.
  • The documents featured below provide an overview of some of the current key documents relevant to medical response planning. The list is not exhaustive.
  • If you are new to the planning process, please refer to pre-existing documents for your jurisdictions and workplace.
  • In 2013, the Institute of Medicine published a workshop summary reviewing Nationwide Response Issues After an Improvised Nuclear Device Attack: Medical and Public Health Considerations for Neighboring Jurisdictions.
  • In 2011, the Nuclear Detonation Scarce Resources Working Group published a series of manuscripts about medical and public health planning and response to a nuclear disaster with scarce resources. (DMPHP, March 2011)
  • HHS/ASPR guidance about planning and preparedness
  • Medical practice, standards of care, available assets, Concept of Operations, and liability issues are complex and each practitioner should consult with experts in his/her venue and organization.
  • 2017 – 2022 Health Care and Preparedness and Response Capabilities (PDF - 795 KB) (HHS/ASPR, November 2016)
    • HHS/ASPR recognizes that there is shared authority and accountability for the health care delivery system's readiness that rests with private organizations, government agencies, and Emergency Support Function-8 (ESF-8, Public Health and Medical Services) lead agencies.
    • Given the many public and private entities that must come together to ensure community preparedness, HCCs serve an important communication and coordination role within their respective jurisdiction(s).

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Key Federal Disaster Response Planning Documents

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Key US Radiation-specific Response Plans


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State, Territorial, Tribal, and Local Government Disaster Response Planning

Radiation Incident Plans

All Hazards Plan

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Incident Command System and Hospital Incident Command System


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Selected National and International Radiation Event-specific Response Planning Documents


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Planning and Informational Platform


  • Technical Resources, Assistance Center, and Information Exchange (TRACIE): Healthcare Emergency Preparedness Information Gateway (HHS/ASPR)
    • Created to meet the information and technical assistance needs of regional ASPR staff, healthcare coalitions, healthcare entities, healthcare providers, emergency managers, public health practitioners, and others working in disaster medicine, healthcare system preparedness, and public health emergency preparedness.
  • Science Preparedness (HHS/ASPR) — Scientific research framework that can enable emergency planners, responders and the whole community to better prepare for, respond to, and recover from major public health emergencies

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Need for an Incident Registry: for Victims and Responders


  • Radiation incidents, both large and small, have potential short and long term consequences for those actually involved (victims and responders) and those who remain concerned about the invident.
  • Registries of those affected can be implemented in various ways by governments and other entities. Privacy and security issues must be respected.
  • Registries can contribute to
    • Lessons learned
    • Improved plans for the future
    • Appropriate medical follow-up: design and implementation
    • Advancement of scientific inquiry: identified and addressed
    • Improvement of radiation protection and safety protocols
  • There is a long history of formal epidemiologic, legal, and forensic follow-up of prior radiation incidents of all kinds.
  • Creation of registries will assist with these endeavors.
References

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US Military